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EU post referendum discussion [see page 136, T&Cs apply with zero tolerance]

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MADCHESTER UTD
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EU post referendum discussion [see page 136, T&Cs apply with zero tolerance]

Post by MADCHESTER UTD » 10 May 2019, 22:20

forestfan wrote:
10 May 2019, 20:25
As I say, even if it’s a “conspiracy”, it’s one that’s essential for all of us. And if it stops wars, so much the better... not all conspiracies have to be bad, do they?
“Stops wars”😳. It’s these banking f*%kers that cause the wars! It’s simple economics; when a country is in war, it’s needs more money. That’s when the central banks profit even more. Take WW1 for example; the U.S were drawn into it by the sinking of the Lusitania in Irish waters. The Germans warned the U.S that if they brought in a ship in these waters that they would be torpedoed (and even printed a warning in American papers). But of course the U.S sent the Lusitania anyway simply as they knew it would be sank by the Germans and thus an excuse for the U.S to enter the war at great loss of life. Same again with Pearl Harbour; the U.S population were in the 90% that they wanted no American blood spilt on a war thousands of miles away. But once pearl harbour happened public opinion swayed unanimously to revenge and of course they joined the war (obviously the Americans helped win the war but do your research on who benefited from the U.S’s 3 year involvement). As before the U.S were warned numerous times that Japan was planning to attack pearl harbour but once again it was allowed to happen for the benefit of these bankers.

Put simply the private central banks LOAN the money with interest to the governments. We the masses then have to pay back the interest via taxes to these evil banking families meaning we are perpetually in debt. Why do you think inflation occurs? Why did a house in England cost say £5k in the 1950’s yet now costs £250k? The government has to continually borrow more money from these central banks just to pay back the interest they (we) owe. And it perpetuates the viscous circle “the more the government borrow, the more interest we pay back, so we have to borrow even more money” and it goes on and on and on. And the more money in circulation, the more the money in our back pocket depreciates. It explains this on the video if you haven’t watched it. Plus these central banks expand and then contract the money supply which results in “boom and bust” scenarios such as the Wall Street crash of the 20’s and the 2008 global recession. They cleverly name their central banks so it’s sounds like a government controlled organisation eg “FEDERAL reserve” “bank of ENGLAND” so the masses except it etc but nothing could be further from the truth. As former Federal reserve chairman Alan Greenspan says ”no agency is above the fed reserve”. Both JFK and Abraham Lincoln both knew the dangers of these central bankers and both vowed to try and enable the U.S government to print its own money rather than be forever in debt to these evil central bankers and we all know what happened to both of them🙄

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forestfan
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Re: EU post referendum discussion [see page 136, T&Cs apply with zero tolerance]

Post by forestfan » 10 May 2019, 22:31

Tacalabala wrote:
10 May 2019, 22:00
forestfan wrote:
10 May 2019, 21:53
Not sure how we would get people that are actually experts in the matter on which they govern... if the PM had to have been a CEO, the Chancellor an accountant, the home/justice secretaries lawyers, the Sports Minister a footballer etc... there wouldn’t be many opportunities for reshuffles!

The civil servants are the ones who are expected to be the experts in a given field and presumably advise ministers what is feasible and how it will be carried out. Doesn’t stop implausible laws being passed, of course...
The logical conclusion is staring you in the face.
What, a civil service technocracy dictatorship?

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Tacalabala
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Re: EU post referendum discussion [see page 136, T&Cs apply with zero tolerance]

Post by Tacalabala » 10 May 2019, 23:16

forestfan wrote:
10 May 2019, 22:31
Tacalabala wrote:
10 May 2019, 22:00
forestfan wrote:
10 May 2019, 21:53
Not sure how we would get people that are actually experts in the matter on which they govern... if the PM had to have been a CEO, the Chancellor an accountant, the home/justice secretaries lawyers, the Sports Minister a footballer etc... there wouldn’t be many opportunities for reshuffles!

The civil servants are the ones who are expected to be the experts in a given field and presumably advise ministers what is feasible and how it will be carried out. Doesn’t stop implausible laws being passed, of course...
The logical conclusion is staring you in the face.
What, a civil service technocracy dictatorship?
I would be careful in how you term this, but I'd certainly like to see a much greater representation in the Lords of experts and professionals elected by their peers, and for the Lords to be able to scrap badly constructed bills. Whether this could work for government is I think an interesting question.

Our system heavily rewards graft and patronage, not excellence. I also find it very strange that we have a prime minister. The Swiss have Federal Council with a rotating chair, this and PR voting would be more appropriate for a modern country.

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